Tag Archives: Libya

The Libya Intervention: Legality and Lessons (Part III)

In my last two posts (here and here), I discussed some of the legal and practical issues raised by the U.S. intervention in Libya, including the issue of whether the Obama Administration violated the War Powers Resolution by declining to seek … Continue reading

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The Libya Intervention: Legality and Lessons (Part II)

In my previous post, I discussed the legal merits and some of the practical consequences of NATO’s intervention in Libya. The legal analysis in that post focused exclusively on international law. The intervention, however, also raised important questions under U.S. … Continue reading

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The Libya Intervention: Legality and Lessons (Part I)

With the NATO action in Libya winding down, now seems to be a good time to take stock of the debate over the legality and practical implications of the intervention. What are the merits of the major legal arguments? What … Continue reading

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International Law as a Tool for Ascertaining Gaddafi’s Whereabouts

In a prior post, I explained that the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) has jurisdiction to prosecute Muammar Gaddafi because the Security Council passed a resolution to that effect in February 2011. Utilizing that jurisdiction, the Court issued arrest warrants against … Continue reading

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ICC Jurisdiction Over Gaddafi

Last week I wrote that the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) is unlikely to try Syria’s President Assad for crimes against humanity because the Court would probably lack jurisdiction. The Rome Statute—the ICC’s founding treaty—empowers the Court to exercise jurisdiction only with … Continue reading

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