Monthly Archives: December 2012

Foreign Travel By Members of Congress (Part III)

As I explained previously (here and here), I’ve been writing a piece that examines Congress’s involvement in international diplomacy. One half of the article documents the nature and extent of the contemporary practice, while the other analyzes that practice from a separation-of-powers … Continue reading

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Foreign Travel by Members of Congress (Part II)

As I mentioned in my previous post, I’ve been writing an article on the subject of international diplomacy by members of Congress, with an emphasis on congressional delegations (“CODELs”) to foreign countries. Information about CODEL practice has been pretty limited, so … Continue reading

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Foreign Travel by Members of Congress (Part I)

The Constitution allocates power over the conduct of foreign relations primarily to the executive, but diplomacy by Congress is common. Members of the House and Senate frequently travel overseas as part of congressional delegations—or “CODELs”—to meet with foreign officials, and … Continue reading

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The Arms Trade Treaty: A Response to the Second Amendment Critique

In my last post on the Arms Trade Treaty, I explained some of the latest draft’s basic features, including restrictions on the ability of states-parties to import and export a variety of conventional arms. In this post I’ll share a few … Continue reading

Posted in Arms Trade Treaty, Foreign Affairs Constitution, Treaty Law | Tagged , | 1 Comment