Category Archives: Foreign Affairs Constitution

Foreign Travel by Members of Congress (Part II)

As I mentioned in my previous post, I’ve been writing an article on the subject of international diplomacy by members of Congress, with an emphasis on congressional delegations (“CODELs”) to foreign countries. Information about CODEL practice has been pretty limited, so … Continue reading

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Foreign Travel by Members of Congress (Part I)

The Constitution allocates power over the conduct of foreign relations primarily to the executive, but diplomacy by Congress is common. Members of the House and Senate frequently travel overseas as part of congressional delegations—or “CODELs”—to meet with foreign officials, and … Continue reading

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The Arms Trade Treaty: A Response to the Second Amendment Critique

In my last post on the Arms Trade Treaty, I explained some of the latest draft’s basic features, including restrictions on the ability of states-parties to import and export a variety of conventional arms. In this post I’ll share a few … Continue reading

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Questions From the Awlaki Litigation

In August 2010, the father of Anwar al-Awlaki filed a federal lawsuit alleging that his son’s inclusion on CIA and DoD “kill lists” violated the Constitution and international law. The court dismissed the suit for lack of standing and for … Continue reading

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A Second Look at the Sharia Law Amendment

Last week, the Tenth Circuit issued a decision on Oklahoma’s “Sharia Law Amendment.” A quick summary for those who haven’t followed: In 2010, Oklahoma voters approved a ballot initiative that amended their state’s constitution to prohibit Oklahoma courts from “considering or using” … Continue reading

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The Libya Intervention: Legality and Lessons (Part III)

In my last two posts (here and here), I discussed some of the legal and practical issues raised by the U.S. intervention in Libya, including the issue of whether the Obama Administration violated the War Powers Resolution by declining to seek … Continue reading

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The Libya Intervention: Legality and Lessons (Part II)

In my previous post, I discussed the legal merits and some of the practical consequences of NATO’s intervention in Libya. The legal analysis in that post focused exclusively on international law. The intervention, however, also raised important questions under U.S. … Continue reading

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