Author Archives: Ryan Scoville

How Cosmopolitan Are International Law Professors?

Milan Markovic (Texas A&M) and I just posted a new piece about U.S. professors of international law. Here’s the abstract: This Article offers an empirical answer to a question of interest among scholars of comparative international law: why do American views … Continue reading

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New Article on International Legal Education

I recently posted a draft of a new article on international legal education. The article examines the curriculum of virtually every law school in the world in order to identify global trends in the teaching of international law, and then theorizes … Continue reading

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International Law from a Cuban Perspective

Recently I returned from a trip to Cuba, where I had the opportunity to interview Celeste Pino Canales, a highly regarded professor of public international law at the University of Havana. I pursued the interview for a couple of reasons. … Continue reading

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New Data on Incursions into Waters Surrounding the Senkaku Islands

The Japanese Coast Guard just released some new data on the “numbers of Chinese government and other vessels that entered Japan’s contiguous zone or intruded into [the] territorial sea surrounding the Senkaku Islands.” Here they are: I see two noteworthy trends: … Continue reading

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New Article on Customary International Law

I just posted a draft of a new article that studies citations in published judicial opinions to evaluate how federal courts go about ascertaining customary international law. For those interested, it’s forthcoming in the Iowa Law Review and available here.

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Legislative Diplomacy After Zivotofsky

Zivotofsky was a case about the recognition power, but it was also the first in quite a while to offer any insight into the Justices’ views on the nature of the President’s power to communicate with foreign sovereigns. Given precedents like Curtiss-Wright, … Continue reading

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The Role of Foreign Perceptions in Zivotofsky v. Kerry

One of the noteworthy disagreements in Zivotofsky concerns the significance of foreign perceptions of U.S. law. The majority suggested the risk of misperception is relevant as a type of functionalist consideration: Pointing to evidence that § 214(d) drew objections from Palestine and … Continue reading

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Further U.S. Assurances on the Senkaku Islands

Prime Minister Abe’s official visit to the United States seems to have been successful in at least one respect: he obtained additional assurances that the U.S.-Japan security treaty covers the Senkaku Islands. On April 28th, President Obama stated that “our treaty … Continue reading

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The Study of International Law in Foreign Law Schools: A Brief History

In my last post I provided a short history on international legal education in the United States. This time I offer the global equivalent: a (very) rough sense for the evolution of law school study requirements in a number of … Continue reading

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The Study of International Law in American Law Schools: A Brief History

As I’ve discussed in other posts, international law has a fairly peripheral role in American legal education. Only eight schools require their students to complete a course on the subject, and the range of international electives tends to be quite limited. … Continue reading

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